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Rare legal settlements demand officers pay too

Man who spent 27 years in prison exonerated of friend’s murder

Wrongfully convicted man awarded record amount

Alleged police-torture victim tastes freedom

Freed prisoner enjoys ‘first day of the rest of my life’

Ruling Tosses Parts of City Disorderly Conduct Law: Activists Sued After Being Arrested for Leafleting Near Armed Forces Recruiting Booth

Paraplegic claims indicted cops ridiculed him

Family of autistic boy sues city, police board

Man freed by clemency act: ‘I can breathe’

Cop accused of hitting handcuffed teen

Lawsuit claims cops lied about crash that killed 8-year-old

Clout-heavy contractor to pay $12 million in fraud settlement

Man imprisoned for nearly 25 years certified innocent

Exonerated man is taking Burge to court

Cops review time in custody: Ex-suspect’s suit says city police aren’t adhering to 48-hour limit

Glenview police board fires cop accused of lying at trial

Multiple courts (including the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals) have decided that whether a prisoner can be strip-searched depends on several factors, including whether the prisoner is being placed in general population of the jail, whether or not there is reason to believe that he will have contraband, etc.

Even if prison officials are entitled to perform strip searches of prisoners, however, the Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments still require that they be done for a legitimate purpose, and not to harass or humiliate prisoners. The Constitution also forbids them from carrying out the strip search in a harassing and humiliating way.

Loevy & Loevy has extensive experience bringing claims challenging strip searches in both prisons and jails. For example, in Young v. County of Cook, we represented men detained at the Cook County Jail who had been subjected to abusive and humiliating shakedowns. In that case, we successfully obtained a $55 million class action settlement and helped convince the Sheriff’s Office to change its policy on searching detainees.

We currently represent a class of women who were strip searched in March 2011 at Lincoln Correctional Center in Lincoln, Illinois, as part of a cadet training exercise. The district court in that case has certified the class, and the case is ongoing. For more information, click here.

Our Experience

Loevy & Loevy has extensive experience representing men and women in custody in jail or prison. We have filed over 100 cases concerning prisoners’ rights. We have taken on individual clients and represented classes of prisoners numbering in the thousands. We have obtained highly favorable verdicts and settlements for prisoners and/or their loved ones. For more information on our successes, visit our Big Wins page.

Loevy & Loevy has offices in Chicago and Denver, but we take cases across the country and have represented prisoners or their loved ones in states all over the country, including Louisiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Alabama, Arkansas, Wisconsin, and more.

Our Commitment

When we take a case, it’s because we believe that a serious constitutional violation has occurred and we are committed to trying to achieve justice for our client. Even though many cases eventually reach settlement, we approach each case with an eye toward getting it into a courtroom. Loevy & Loevy is known for its willingness to take hard cases to trial (and win them), and has a nationally recognized reputation for success in the courtroom.

We always work on a contingency basis in prisoners’ rights cases, so you will not be on the hook for any attorney fees unless we win.

Many prisoners’ rights cases require medical or correctional experts to give opinions about the standard of care in the correctional setting. These experts and other costs associated with civil litigation can cost thousands or tens of thousands of dollars. Loevy & Loevy agrees to front the costs for our clients so that they can vindicate their constitutional rights even if they cannot afford to pay.

Contact Us

If you or your loved one has been the victim of an abusive strip search, contact us today for a free consultation. You can call us at (312) 243-5900, toll-free (888) 644-6459, or contact us online.

You can also write us at:

Loevy & Loevy

Attn: Prisoners’ Rights

311 North Aberdeen St., 3rd Floor

Chicago, Illinois 60607

If you are currently incarcerated, please remember to write “Legal Mail” or “Attorney Mail” on the envelope.

Please keep in mind that all legal claims have deadlines—called statutes of limitations—that require you to file a lawsuit within a certain period of time in order to preserve your legal rights. These deadlines can be quite short (sometimes within six months to a year) and do not stop running even while you are looking for legal representation.

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Loevy Blog

Topic: Police Misconduct

George Floyd’s death was no accident – and neither is your local police misconduct

I’ve spent 16 years representing the criminally accused. Sometimes I like to write or blog to help clarify my thoughts on subjects that are on my mind. The murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police has been on my mind. All the more as, with tears coming down my cheeks, I watched George Floyd’s sister,… Read More

Two Black Men, Railroaded as Teenagers Into Wrongfully Serving Most of Their Adult Lives Behind Bars, Sue Chicago Police

Two Black men who were wrongfully imprisoned most of their adult lives today sued Chicago Police in federal court for fabricating evidence against them and suppressing evidence of their innocence. Each were sentenced to 31 years in maximum security prison and served more than 16 years behind bars. John Fulton and Anthony Mitchell, who were… Read More